Pelargonium Species


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The Pelargonium species comprises of about 200 or more perennials, succulents and shrubs.

The Pelargonium species are equally as appealing as their cultivated varieties, zonals, regals and ivy leafed and can be captivating and intriguing plants. They are reasonably easy to grow and rarely have any problems with pests and diseases.

They have become more admired over the centuries because of their delightful perfumed flowers and aromatic scented leaves.They have also gained popularity in the production of aromatic oils and also medicinal properties.

Pelargoniums are generally known as Geraniums but were later classed as two individual groups in 1789 by Charles L Heritier. The word pelargonium is derived from t
he Greek word “pelargospineapple p flower water mark websmall” meaning stork because the seed head resembles that of a stork.

The first known pelargoniums to be cultivated in Europe was the P.triste, a tuberous rooted plant which could withstand long voyages by ship.

Thousands of cultivated varieties of pelargoniums selected for their desirable characteristics, were originally from a few native species which may still exist in South Africa to this day.

Pelargonium Species World is a Mother and Daughter family business which specializes in Species Pelargoniums situated in a mountainous area of Crete, Greece with the natural beauty of the fauna and Flora.

We are working together with nature and wildlife, all our plants are grown naturally in a natural environment with no chemicals, pesticides or fungicides.

All our seeds are fresh and are carefully picked by hand.  Please visit my website at www.pelargoniumspeciesworld.com

 

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