Creating a Wildlife Garden

vincent-van-zalinge-umTMnQOALSE-unsplash

Photo by Vincent Van Zalinge-unsplash.com

A wildlife garden can bring beauty and tranquillity to your surrounds with butterflies, birds, bees, and other wildlife.

Bringing wildlife to your garden has many benefits, we have a better connection with nature where we can learn to co-exist with the natural environment and encourage insects such as butterflies, dragonflies, bees, birds, reptiles and amphibians to your surroundings while creating a peaceful and relaxing retreat.
Making a wildlife garden supports the local flora and fauna while providing them with a nature inspired habitat such as a sanctuary for solitary bees, ladybirds, & beetles made out of bamboo canes, old logs, bricks, twigs and straw or a wildflower meadow, a rock garden, a pond, bog garden or a water feature to encourage frogs, birds and dragonflies.
Flowers & nectar rich plants not only look attractive in the garden but can also appeal to insect pollinators such as bees, butterflies and moths which collect pollen and for birds which eat seeds and berries.

A bird house, bird table, hanging feeders or a bird bath can also help encourage birds to your surroundings especially if they are close to the house where you can view them from your window.

Trees, shrubs, hedging and wall climbers are also great for providing a hiding place or an nesting area for birds and also lizards.
Earthworms are great for aerating and improving the quality of the soil and can also provide food for various wildlife.
Leaving in weeds such as dandelions, daisies, thistles, poppies, bell flowers, doves-foot, bind-weed and wild carrot not only encourages bees, butterflies and other insects but can look amazing in a wild flower meadow with long grasses in a small area of your garden or mixed with plants within a raised border, Ants are also good for gathering and dispersing seeds.

Adding a variety of different shaped flowers to your garden can encourage several types of insects.
Flower shapes include tubular, bell, funnel, saucer, rosette and funnel shapes which come in many colours and sizes.
Some bees, wasps, moths and butterflies have long tongues known as proboscis which feed on pollen and nectar and can reach far into the flower, Some flower types are also only pollinated by hummingbirds.

Other ideas to encourage wildlife include: Creating a home for solitary bees, creating a wild flower meadow, bog garden, water feature or a pond, attracting more butterflies and creating a haven for birds.

Tropical colourful Love bird scarf

scarf sausage tree new

The new tropical love bird scarf is now available on etsy http://www.etsy.com/listing/687126895/tropical-love-african-sausage-tree

It is a elegant long and thin scarf 150 cm x 16.5  with a pinky orange background and sliver gutta outline and green red blue love birds and a African sausage tree with leaves, fruit, flowers branches and buds.

Endangered species silk scarves

New hand painted scarves are now available of  birds and animals of the endangered species at this link https://www.etsy.com/shop/CharisEstelleSilkArt

ground dove scarf 3

The first scarf contains a pair of critically endangered Polynesian ground doves (male and female) on one side and an endangered tuamotu sand piper on the other side, also with plants and flowers, banana plant, hibiscus etc.

These birds are listed on the IUCN red list mainly due to habitat loss and newly introduced predators, The Polynesian ground doves are native to Tuamotus, French Polynesia and live in tropical forests underneath trees, shrubs and coconut palms, only about 100-120 exist in the wild.
The Tuamotu Sandpiper is native to Tuamotu Island, French Polynesia and lives in coastal areas and thickets, only 250-1000 birds exist in the wild.

saola scarf new
The second is a Vietnamese forest themed scarf made from 100% ponge silk containing a pair of critically endangered Saola or Asian unicorn on one side and a critically endangered Kouprey on the other, also containing plants and foliage of Vietnamese forests.

These wild Bovidae are listed as critically endangered on the IUCN redlist mainly due to habitat loss and for being hunted for their meat,horns,fur and medicinal uses.

The Saola are native to forests in Vietnam and Laos, only about 200-24 now exist in the wild. They are also known as the Asian unicorn because of their long straight horns.

The Kouprey or Grey ox were once native to Cambodia, Laos, Thailand and Vietnam but now may only remain in wildlife sanctuary’s and protected forests, they are believed to be extinct or very close to extinction.

These scarves would make a lovely present for a birthday, anniversary etc