Pelargonium species with elegant white flowers

Pelargonium odoratissimum-apple scented leaf

The classical and elegant white flowers of the pelargonium species can look just as stunning in the garden as the other colour varieties especially when grown together to add colour and fragrance. They can also stand out against the green leaves of various shades, textures & shapes.
Pelargonium odoratissimum is especially a lovely low growing plant, not only because of its delightful white flowers with tiny purple blotches on the upper petals but also for its strong apple-scented rounded velvety crinkled leaves which grow well in medium-sized pots. It is similar to the Pelargonium album which means ‘white flowers’ in Latin to which the leaf stems are semi-succulent like that of P. odoratissimum although the leaves have a more minty apple fragrance. They grow well in shady mixed with other plants in a border. View on website

Pelargonium tomentosum-mint scented leaf

Pelargonium tomentosum has attractive clusters of small white flowers with bright purple markings on the upper petals arranged on long flower stalks, the leaves have a soft velvety texture with a peppermint fragrance, they grow well as ground cover, in pots or planted in the garden but prefer shade in hot climates. It is native to the Western Cape and the leaves can be used in baking. Pictured left

Pelargonium grandifolium pictured below has attractive large creamy white flowers with dark reddish markings on the upper petals and bluish green digitate leaves with a waxy texture. It is a slightly woody shrub native to South Western and Western Cape which is ideal as a border plant in a rock garden or grown in a pot. The name grandifolium means ‘large flower’ and was brought to Kew Gardens in the late 1700s by Francis Masson during his travels to South Africa. Pictured below right.

Pelargonium grandifolium

Pelargonium abrotanifolium has small dainty white flowers and purple markings on the upper petals with lovely feathery deeply divided greyish-green leaves which are aromatic. It is native to a large area of the Western Cape towards the Eastern Cape, of South Africa. This plants name is derived from the Latin meaning ‘Southern-wood leaves’ which refers to its likeness to the leaves of Artemisia abrotanum, a shrub, also connected to the Greek goddess Artemis the goddess of the hunt. Ideal growing with other low growing plants in the garden or in a medium-sized pot, pictured below.

Pelargonium abrotanifolium
Pelargonium scabrum-lemon scented leaf

Pelargonium scabrum has white or pink flowers with purple markings on the upper petals. A pretty pelargonium with lemon scented rhomboidal rough leaves. The name ‘scabrum’ is derived from the Latin meaning having a raised texture. It is native to the Western Cape, Northern Cape and Eastern Cape. Ideal for pots, fragrant gardens, rock gardens and succulent gardens. pictured below

view on website

Pelargonium mollicomum is a graceful plant with creamy white flowers and thin purple lines on the upper petals. This plant has a slightly exotic appearance with pineapple scented light green leaves, its name is derived from the Latin meaning soft hairs. It is native to the Eastern Cape and is ideal for fragrant gardens, window boxes, pots or hanging baskets. Pictured below, view on website

Pelargonium mollicomum-pineapple scented leaf

The flowers of Pelargonium peltatum are very attractive and can range in colour from white, pale pink to pale purple. The leaves are slightly succulent, rounded and fleshy with a light fragrance, resembling an ivy leaf. It is a trailing plant native to the Eastern and Western cape of South Africa which is ideal for hanging baskets, pots and planted next to other shrubs or trees, the leaves and petals have medical properties. pictured below

Pelargonium exstpulatum is a charming pelargonium with white flowers and dark reddish markings, the two upper petals are joined together and the lower is shaped like a spoon. The leaves have a sweet/spicy scent which are rhomboid and grey-green in colour. It is native to South Africa in the Southern Cape, in areas of the Klein Karoo and the Little Karoo. Ideal for pots or rock gardens in dry environments. pictured below

For more information on the Pelargonium species please visit our website at pelargonium species world

Pelargonium exstipulatum

The Pelargonium blandfordianum hybrid and its related cultivars

pelargonium blandfordianum

Pelargonium blandfordianum is a lovely pelargonium with deeply incised grayish leaves which are fragrant with a scent of rose and white flowers with reddish blotches on the under petals.
It is believed to be a hybrid between P. radula and P. quinquevulnereum. There are a few variations of this plant, ‘album’ refers to the white flowered form and ‘roseum’ to the rose pink flowered form
which has a distinct rosy wormwood fragrance on the leaves.

This hybrid was developed during the early 1800s, introduced by George Spencer Churchill the Marquis of Blandford to which this plant derives its name. George Spencer was a keen and accomplished botanist while he resided at White knights park estate, a medieval manor which is now part of the university of Reading (white knights campus).
Here he became widely known for has large collection of rare and exotic plants from around the globe. Various species were also transported there from the royal gardens by order of the king. George took out a loan to expand and enhance his new estate, creating many new features, such as the ‘Chantilly garden’ which contained several conservatories possibly for tropical plants, a vineyard, bridges, a wide variety of trees, a botanical garden with a wide selection of unique plants, many from America, a wilderness and many seats, fountains, grotto’s and pavilions. Later the gardens fell into decline after George Spencer became bankrupt and his creditors set fire to his house in rage, the rest of the estate was sold off. But remains of the gardens was again found after the world wars.

photo by James Eggleton-unsplash.com

Pelargonium radula is a parent of the hybrid Pelargonium blandfordianum, it has decorative deeply incised leaves with a lemony rose fragrance and small pale pink flowers with dark purple markings on the upper petals. It has similar characteristics to P. graveolens which is closely related and possibly an equivalent to P. radens or a clone and also has a few forms with varied flower colours. The other parent is
Pelargonium quinquevulnereum

which was also believed to have been a hybrid, grown by Mr Armstrong who lived in Hampshire, that shares some similarities to Pelargonium graveolens.

Pelargonium radens is a tall upright shrub with delicate grey green finely divided leaves and light purple flowers with darker markings on the upper petals. The fragrance of the leaves are rose lemon scented and grows well in medium to large pots often growing beside other Plants.
Pelargonium graveolens has soft velvety triangular deeply incised leaves which have a somewhat rosy mint scent, a well known pelargonium since the 17th century in food and beverages, tea, potpourri and perfume.
Other hybrids related to Pelargonium radens or Pelargonium graveolens is P. ‘citrosum’ which has strong citronella lemon fragrance with pale pink flowers also known as the mosquito plant which is popular in the United States & Canada and is a cultivar of P. graveolens, also said to help deter mosquitoes.

P. ‘lady plymouth’ is a hybrid from the species
P. ‘graveolens’ with silver & cream leaves which
are variegated with a minty scent and light
purple flowers, there is also a similar cultivar
known as P ‘grey lady plymouth‘ with has grey
green leaves.
P. ‘Cinnamon rose’ has spicy cinnamon
scented leaves, and an upright growth with short
branches and pale purple flowers.
P. ‘Secret love’ is a eucalyptus scented leaf
pelargonium with light pink flowers showing
some characteristics to P. capitaum.
P. x melissinum is a cross between P. crispum
and P. graveolens which has large lemon balm
scented deeply cut leaves and pink flowers.

P. ‘rosemint’ has mint rose scented
leaves which are variegated and is used in
perfumes, showing some similarities to P.
lady plymouth.
P. ‘westerlund’ rose lemon scented leaf
close resembling that of P. graveolens.

Latest Pelargonium species & fresh seeds

Pelargonium  graveolens L’Her
Rose geranium
A beautiful pelargonium  which is  believed to be a cross between graveolens x radens and is often used for rose oil in perfume, soap and also toothpaste. It has pale pink  flowers with thin purple lines on the upper petals & each flowering stalk has about 1-7 flowers.  P. Graveolens L’ Her is an up right shrub with a spreading growth often trailing along the ground and up walls to reach towards the light  and prefers slightly sandy soil conditions in semi shade. It is ideal for fragrant gardens, rock gardens,or pots.

Pelargonium  ranunculophyllum
Horse shoe zoned pelargonium   
A lovely graceful pelargonium which has attractive rounded palmately lobed leaves with a reddish to deep purple zone (horse shoe mark) in the centre. The flowers are  narrow and white to pink sometimes with reddish  markings on the upper petals and pale orange to yellow pollen,  they are arranged on  long upright flowering stalks which  contains about 2-3 flowers. P. ranunculophyllum  is a low growing  plant  with long delicate stems   and  is smaller in size than P. alchemilloides  which has similar characteristics and with thinner stems.  It is native to the Eastern Cape where it grows in rocky sandstone or on mountainsides over 1000 m,  best grown in part shade in pots or planted in the garden and also combined with other plants.

Pelargonium  littorale
Pelargonium littorale Huegel
A graceful pelargonium with delicate pinkish stems and pale pink flowers  with dark purple markings on the upper petals & each flowering stalk contains 2-7 flowers. P. littorale is an upright low growing shrub which grows to about 10 – 50 cm in height and has heart shaped leaves. It is native to South West Australia  where it grows in coastal areas from the South Eastern corner to Geraldton in the North.  The name Littorale is derived from the Latin word ‘Littorlis” meaning shore (or grows close to the shore or littoral waters. Best planted in a small to medium sized pot or planted in the garden which is partly shaded by taller plants or rock garden.

New fresh seeds of Pelargonium mollicomum, pineapple scented leaf.
An attractive & graceful pelargonium with a slightly exotic appearance, it has creamy white flowers with thin purple lines on the upper petals & each flowering stalk has about 1-5 flowers. The light green rounded leaves are pineapple scented with a dark zone in the centre.  P. Mollicomum is a low growing shrub which reaches to about 50 cm/20 inches in height and prefers slightly sandy soil conditions. The name “mollicomum” is derived from the Latin word meaning soft hairs. It is ideal for fragrant gardens, window boxes,hanging baskets or pots.

New fresh seeds Pelargonium scabrum
A pretty pelargonium with strong lemon scented rhomboidal shaped leaves and white flowers.

View https://www.pelargoniumspeciesworld.com/page33.html

New fresh seeds P. hispidum – balsam
New fresh seeds P. odoratissmum-apple
New fresh seeds P. grossularioides- fruit
New fresh seeds P. Betulinum

View website : www.pelargoniumspeciesworld.com

Chocolate, hazelnut and Pelargonium tomentosum mousse

This creamy chocolate and minty dessert with pelargonium tomentosum leaves, hazelnuts ,Greek sheep yogurt and fruit makes a mouth watering delicious sweet dish to enjoy after your main meal in spring and summer.

Ingredients
1 packet of chocolate pudding power (7 servings)
I pot of Greek sheep yogurt or plain Greek style yogurt
4-5 leaves of pelargonium tomentosum, finely chopped
25 grams of chopped hazelnuts
3 to 4 small pears cut into small cubes
A sprinkle of cinnamon
A large drizzle of honey for each dish
Other fruits of your choice like peach, nectarine, strawberries, blueberries, prunes, watermelon or kiwifruit.

Dessert with pear and nectarines fruits

To prepare
First follow the instructions on the chocolate pudding packet, usually 48 grams of pudding power with 4-5 tablespoons of sugar and 660 ml of fresh or evaporated milk.
When you have prepared the mixture ready to add to the dessert dishes, add the chopped hazelnuts and pelargonium tomentosum leaves and mix well, then pour equally into each dish and leave to cool.
You can also choose to prepare only a few desserts and keep some back for later placing them in the fridge.  
Spoon the yogurt on top of each pudding individually, then add the chopped pear along with other fruits of your choice.
Sprinkle a little cinnamon on top of each dessert, a few chopped hazelnuts and a large drizzle of  honey .

Beautiful species pelargoniums native to Australia

Pelargonium littorale (left) is a low growing upright and delicate shrub which is similar to that of Pelargonium capitatum rose scented leaf and pelargonium grossularioides fruit scented leaf..
The flowers are pale pink with darker markers and each flowering stalk contains 2- 7 flowers with long and ovate sepals, the leaves can range from  oval, heart shaped, or orbicular.
P. littorale grows from about  10 to 50 cm’s in height and is covered with  glandular hairs, green to pinkish stems, classified under the section Peristera, as a subspecies (pelargonium littorale- Huegel subsp. Littorale)

This plant is native to South West Australia mostly in coastal areas from the South Eastern corner to the Geraldton sand plains in the north.. Which is why it was named Littorale from the Latin word ‘littoralis’ meaning shore (or grows close to the shore or littoral waters) It can also occur in Victoria and areas of South Australia.
South Western Australia is a eco zone with a Mediterranean like climate which has dry and hot summers and wet winters know as the botanical province which consists of a wide range of plant and animal life as well as woodlands, forests and eco areas of scrub land. This region also has honey possums which forage on flowering shrubs for nectar and pollen. Western bush wallabies and short tailed scrub wallabies.

Pelargonium helmsii (carolin) also known as the Alpine storks bill is native to bio-regions of victoria and New South Wales in mountainous areas including – Northern fall (highlands), Victorian alps and the snowy mountains, it has dark pink flowers with darker markings and oblong sepals with each flowering stalk containing up to 5-12 flowers. It is listed as vulnerable.
Pelargonium renifolium Swinbourne is also native to South Australia and has very small light pink flowers and a greater sprawling growth.

Pelargonium rodneyanum (below) also called the Magenta storks bill is native to specific areas of Australia including New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia. Where is grows on rocky hillsides, sclerophyll forests, woodlands and shrub land.  It has striking dark pink flowers with darker pink markings of the upper petals, on a long delicate flower stalk which contains up to seven flowers. The leaves are soft, light to dark green with shallow lobes and oval to narrow ovate in shape, it grows to about 45 cm’s in height with short stems and also produces brown tuberous roots.

This plant was named after Admiral George Rodney 1718-1792, a British Naval officer, who travelled along with Captain James Cook as head scientist exploring New Zealand and Australia collecting plant specimens for  the gardens of Kew.
Pelargonium rodneyanum is also grown as a garden plant in pots, flower beds or rock gardens because of its colourful flowers. It grows well in slightly acidic soil which has good drainage and is also a popular plant for ground cover.

Pelargonium alchemilloides (below) also known as the lady’s mantle-leaved pelargonium or Wildemaliva is native to a wide area of South Africa apart from the Northern Cape and grows in moist lowland regions usually in clay and loam soil conditions. It  has also been naturalised in temperate coastal areas of South-Western, Western Australia where it grows in shrublands, grasslands and woodlands. This plant has a rambling growth and is low growing, it adapts well to hot and dry environments with much rainfall during the winter period and has an underground tuber.

The flowers can range in colour from dark pink, yellow or white with darker markings and each flowering stalk contains about 3 to 6 flowers. The leaves are rounded or oval in shape with a purplish brown horseshoe zone in the centre, lobed with hairs which gives the impression of a silky texture.
The name alchemilloides refers to the plant Alchemilla (lady’s mantle) which bears some resemblance to this pelargonium, it is a perennial with green to yellow flowers and fan shaped leaves under the Rosaceae family to which the tea is used for medicinal purposes.

Pelargonium australe (below) is endemic to the whole of Australia apart from the Northern territory as well as eastern Tasmania and New Zealand, where it is also known by the name of the native storks bill.. It has white to light pink flowers and darker markings on the upper petals, arranged on long flower stalks which contains up to 12 flowers.

The leaves are slightly scented, hairy & rounded/ or oval with shallow lobes and the plant as a whole grows to about 30 cm’s in height, in its native habitat it grows in rocky areas, on cliffs by the coast, or in sand dunes.
The name australe means Southern possibly meaning the southern hemisphere. The stems of this plant are not so succulent like than that of P.drummondii, while the leaves, also show some similarities to P. capitatum but do not have rose scented leaves.

Pelargonium drummondii (below) shares some similarities to Pelargonium australe, but the stems are more branching with smaller flowers and thinner stems and also P. capitatum which grows all over the South West of Australia was original brought over by early colonists from Britain.

It is an upright shrub which grows to about 10 to 40 cm’s in height with succulent like leaves which are dark green & heart shaped. The flowers are white or pale pink  usually with  darker markings and each flowing stalk contains about 4 to 7 flowers.
It is native to coastal areas of South West Australia and also amongst granitic rocks on sloping ground, hills or small mountains.
This plant was given the name drummondii after James Drummond a Scottish gardener and botanist who became an early setter and collector of  newly discovered plants in Australia.

Pelargonium inodorum (below) which also goes by the name of the wild pelargonium or storks bill is an annual which is native to over a large area of  New South Wales where it grows in forests, woodlands, or grassy and rocky areas and also in Victoria, Tasmania and New Zealand.

The flowers are white or pink with darker markings of dark pink or purple and each flowering stalk contains about 3-14 flowers with oval or heart shaped leaves that are covered in short hairs. The flowers are small and are just a little larger in size than the sepals.
The name inodorum means unscented possibly referring to the flowers as it is believed to have slightly aromatic leaves.

Urban gardening

chuttersnap-IfmqOuOkaOA-unsplash

photo by Chuttersnap- unsplash.com


With the growth of cities and expansion of towns, growing plants in these areas can help improve the environment & air pollution.

People living in an urban environment can also benefit from growing and caring for plants, flowers and also vegetables, they not only provide beauty to the surroundings with colourful, fragrant flowers and herbs but they can also improve the air quality, reduce pollution or block unwanted views or noise as well as getting better connected with nature, reducing stress and improving mental health.

There are many ways that you can grow plants in an urban setting, whether you have a small balcony, limited garden space, a roof garden, pots and containers around the house, an apartment or if you grow plants indoors.
Growing plants in containers is ideal if you have limited space in your garden, or if you have a small patio area or balcony. Containers can be placed on steps, outside a doorway or in the corners of a balcony or patio to make room for a sitting out area for relaxation. Edible scented leaf pelargoniums can be grown in containers preferably in a sunny area within easy reach so you can add them to food and beverages as well as growing herbs, vegetables such as lettuce, cherry tomatoes, strawberries, parsley and editable flowers such as nasturtiums and violets.

Trellises can create a more private area on your balcony, patio area or roof garden which can be easily attached to the wall where you can grow climbing plants with lovely fragrant flowers such as roses, honey suckle, passionflower, jasmine or simple runner beans. Vertical crates can also be used as an alternative to trellis or for something more elegant balcony flower planters with trellis attached which can also be purchased online or in garden centres.

Hanging baskets are great not only for balconies & patio areas but also if you live in an apartment without a garden or balcony, you can simply attach them to the wall outside your window or door way, on the walls of your balcony or on railings, with plants such as pelargoniums, colourful flowering blooms or vegetables & herbs. Vertical gardening also works well by fixing containers to the wall or growing plants onto the wall itself using a special frame.
If you have a flat roof you could consider creating a roof garden, by using light weight containers and soil. Fixing trellis to areas of the roof can help reduce wind gusts and also protect your plants, but you will also need to add a water system to water them regularly.

Growing plants on the balcony or patio

Balconies and patios are ideal for urban living by getting you more involved with growing and caring for plants, gaining a feel for nature and the outdoors, while providing a private area for relaxation or pleasant views. Depending on the number of hours of sun you have during the day can determine the type of plants that would be ideal for your balcony or patio. If you have hot sun most of the day you could consider growing more succulents, herbs or exotic plants, or if you have a busy life you could try self watering pots, hydroponics or by adding more shade to your balcony or patio with trellis, bamboo shading, shade cloth or retractable awning. For balconies and patios with shade part of the day you could consider plants like morning glory, marigold, pansies, chrysanthemums, verbena, fuchsia, ferns, fruits and vegetables or various types of pelargoniums such as P. tomentosum, P. denticulatum and P. quinquelobatum.
Plants require about 12 to 16 hours of sun light per day, so if you have low light on your balcony you could try using artificial lighting such as lamps or led lights to improve growth and the overall health of the plant.
If you have mostly pot plants it is recommend to use good quality soil which is rich in nutrients for healthy growth and longevity in small containers and also the use of Fertilizer.
Shrub like plants may take up more room unless it is cut back frequently or if it is kept like a standard or a bonsai, so small or tall upright plants may be a better opinion for providing extra space on your balcony for other plants or furniture. There are many ways to brighten up the look of your balcony or patio, no matter what the size, Adding rugs, cushions and folding tables and/or chairs can give a homely feel, as well as making it easy to store them away quickly when you need the space. Lighting is great for the evening and night time, there are various types that are ideal for balconies which include string lights and bulb string, Led string lights, paper lanterns or lamps.
Adding hanging baskets or containers to the walls of your balcony or patio is another way of bringing more plants without taking up too much space, as long as they drainage holes at the base. A few plants which are ideal for hanging baskets on a balcony include tangled heart vine, dwarf morning glories (evoluvlus), sword fern, devils ivy, dwarf jade plant(portulacaria afra) and inch plant Tradescantia zebina

Roof gardens

Many cities around the world are now thinking up new ways to go green, by growing organic vegetables, creating a meadow of flowers or a garden with grass and trees and plants on rooftops, such as the Brooklyn Grange in New York which has the largest roof farms in the world, and grows a large number of their own produce, including organic vegetables such as leaf greens, salad mixes, rocket, radishes, turnips kale and chard, fruits, edible flowers and fragrant herbs & selling them to communities in the city, which are grown naturally while supporting the ecosystems and also have around 20 beehives on the roofs around the city.
Roof gardens are not only great for providing you with fresh vegetables and fruits, flowers and herbs which you can enjoy at home, but also the benefits of reducing the amount of heat which is built up round the city caused mostly by concrete buildings, roads & pathways which absorbs the heat of the sun and increases the temperature, as well as car engines and air conditioning units. Plants can not reach a surface temperature higher than 5 c , it absorbs water from the roots which moves throughout the plant known as transpiration, so growing more plants around the city will help reduce the temperature and also reduce smog and pollution which can lead to respiratory problems.
There are a few different urban methods which are used on roof gardens these include hydroponics when plants are grown without the use of soil but in a mineral and nutrient enriched water at the roots which is pumped and moves around in pots, tanks or tubs or plastic hydroponic reservoirs. Aeroponics is when plants are grown without the use of soil in an enclosed space by spaying the roots with air or mist which contains nutrients often by using a Aeroponic plant support device. Green roof is a living vegetation such as moss, grass, perennials, herbs or shrubs which grows on top of a roof or building by using layers of waterproof membrane, filter, drainage and a growing medium.

Containers are probably the most easiest and most affordable for growing plants on roofs, such as pots, tubs, barrels or hanging baskets which are especially good if you have limited space, light weight pots such as plastic is recommended, so not too much weight is on your roof top (unless you have strong winds), as plants will become heavier as they grow and it is advisable to make sure your roof is strong enough if you wish to place many pots on your roof. You will also need good access to a water hose, electricity for lighting and to think about how you will get plants and other items up on to the roof. A water butt could be used with a hose attachment or drip irrigation. Trellis, hedging, screens or fencing maybe good for reducing wind or hot sun on the roof top.
Low growing trees, shrubs, herbs and vegetables can grow well on roof tops but If you have hot sun most of the day on your roof it maybe best to get drought tolerant plants.
Raised beds is another alternative, when the soil has been raised in a container such as a frame or box, this can improve the soil quality especially when mixed with organic matter such as from a compost bin, the soil will also provide better drainage but may need more water during the summer, although because of its small size watering shouldn’t be much of a problem, drip irrigation is also a good and easy way to water them. Raised beds are fairly simple to make by creating a frame which can be made out of wood, stone, brick and in any style you require whether you like a modern, traditional or rustic feel.
Outdoor dinning & relaxing furniture, pergolas or even a shed can also improve the overall look of your roof garden.

partly from the July newsletter

more info at http://www.pelargoniumspeciesworld.com

Best flowering pelargoniums for Spring

Best flowering pelargoniums for Spring include: 

P. denticulatum a large slightly bushy shrub full of pastel pink flowers during Spring which looks stunning when lit up by the sun and also attracts honey bees, excellent for a border plant.

peli denti watermarked

Pelargonium graveolens which grows well in medium to large pots and is an attractive plant with rose/mint scented leaves and pretty pink flowers and a lovely plant to grow near the house in a sunny area.

Other spring flower pelargoniums include P. quercifolium- grows well with other shrubs like rosemary.

P. visscossimum, P. odoratissmum. P. vitifolium, P. grossularioides, P. tongaense, P. elongatum and P. greytonense.

Pelargonium pattern designs

Fabric, wallpaper and home decor of various pelargonium species are now available at spoonflower.com with free shipping worldwide until the 6th March at https://www.spoonflower.com/profiles/charisestellepatterndesigns

pattern 1for website Pelargonium capitatum rose scented leaf –https://www.spoonflower.com/en/fabric/9560174-pelargonium-capitatum-rose-scented-leaf-by-charisestellepatterndesigns

pattern 2 for webpage Pelargonium greytonense- https://www.spoonflower.com/en/fabric/9540352-pelargonium-greytonense-pattern-by-charisestellepatterndesigns

pattern 3 for website Pelargonium denticulatum balsam scented https://www.spoonflower.com/en/fabric/9595019-pelargonium-denticulatum-pattern-design-by-charisestellepatterndesigns

pattern 5 for website Pelargonium odoratissium apple scented-https://www.spoonflower.com/en/fabric/9489026-pelargonium-odoratissimum-pattern-design-by-charisestellepatterndesigns

Spring flowers- Pelargonium denticulatum

As we are getting towards early Spring with a few sunny days, Pelargonium denticulatum is now starting to flower with its first flower buds this year.

P. denticulatum has pinkish purple flowers with darker markings on the upper petals and dark green sticky divided leaves which are balsam scented. This plant grows to 150 cm /59 inches in height and grows in slightly damp areas.

Garden journal-scented pelargonium species

My latest book- garden journal is now available

journal garden front cover

A garden journal for all your garden needs which covers information on seed germination & various methods, growing pelargoniums,stem cuttings, pruning, plant anatomy and for planing your garden a weekly calendar, notes, seed & plant list, plant expenses and a garden design layout for designing /creating new ideas your garden.

Available in various Amazon stores-https://www.amazon.com/Garden-journal-scented-pelargonium-species/dp/B0851MXWKR/ref=sr_1_2