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Pelargonium Species


panda flower 2

The Pelargonium species comprises of about 200 or more perennials, succulents and shrubs.

The Pelargonium species are equally as appealing as their cultivated varieties, zonals, regals and ivy leafed and can be captivating and intriguing plants. They are reasonably easy to grow and rarely have any problems with pests and diseases.

They have become more admired over the centuries because of their delightful perfumed flowers and aromatic scented leaves.They have also gained popularity in the production of aromatic oils and also medicinal properties.

Pelargoniums are generally known as Geraniums but were later classed as two individual groups in 1789 by Charles L Heritier. The word pelargonium is derived from t
he Greek word “pelargospineapple p flower water mark websmall” meaning stork because the seed head resembles that of a stork.

The first known pelargoniums to be cultivated in Europe was the P.triste, a tuberous rooted plant which could withstand long voyages by ship.

Thousands of cultivated varieties of pelargoniums selected for their desirable characteristics, were originally from a few native species which may still exist in South Africa to this day.

Pelargonium Species World is a Mother and Daughter family business which specializes in Species Pelargoniums situated in a mountainous area of Crete, Greece with the natural beauty of the fauna and Flora.

We are working together with nature and wildlife, all our plants are grown naturally in a natural environment with no chemicals, pesticides or fungicides.

All our seeds are fresh and are carefully picked by hand.  Please visit my website at www.pelargoniumspeciesworld.com

 

Greek Style salad with Pelargonium graveolens,cherry tomatoes & feta cheese

This healthy & spicy salad filled with cos lettuce, cherry tomatoes, black olives, feta, pelargonium graveolens leaves and herbs make
a refreshing side dish to enjoy with your meal,
The sweetness of the cherry tomatoes, aromatic flavour of the herbs, as well as the tangy fruity taste of the feta and black olives
creates a beneficial & nutritious dish filled with delicious
vegetables and greens.

Ingredients 4 servings


125g cherry tomatoes, cut in half
1 cos lettuce, leaves removed and ripped into small pieces
I red onion cut into small wedges
3-4 leaves of pelargonium graveolens, finely chopped
Finely chopped herbs- basil, oregano and mint
Salt and pepper to taste
80g Black olives
12g chopped Walnuts or pine nuts
180g of feta cheese, cut into small cubes
A sprinkle of red wine vinegar
80g of olive oil
1 cucumber, cut into thin slices and cut in half
Tinned Anchovies in olive oil optional

To prepare
First remove the lettuce leaves and wash them thoroughly, drying them well with kitchen roll. Then rip the leaves and arrange them on a salad dish.

Add the cherry tomatoes, black olives and cucumber, then blend the ingredients together with your hands or with salad tongs, sprinkle over the herbs and pelargonium leaves
making sure all the mixture is well blended.

Cut the feta into small cubes and place them around the dish,
sprinkle with oregano followed by red wine vinegar and olive
oil.

You can also choose to add a few leaves of batavia lettuce,
beetroot, green peppers or mix with pasta.

The Pelargonium blandfordianum hybrid and its related cultivars

pelargonium blandfordianum

Pelargonium blandfordianum is a lovely pelargonium with deeply incised grayish leaves which are fragrant with a scent of rose and white flowers with reddish blotches on the under petals.
It is believed to be a hybrid between P. radula and P. quinquevulnereum. There are a few variations of this plant, ‘album’ refers to the white flowered form and ‘roseum’ to the rose pink flowered form
which has a distinct rosy wormwood fragrance on the leaves.

This hybrid was developed during the early 1800s, introduced by George Spencer Churchill the Marquis of Blandford to which this plant derives its name. George Spencer was a keen and accomplished botanist while he resided at White knights park estate, a medieval manor which is now part of the university of Reading (white knights campus).
Here he became widely known for has large collection of rare and exotic plants from around the globe. Various species were also transported there from the royal gardens by order of the king. George took out a loan to expand and enhance his new estate, creating many new features, such as the ‘Chantilly garden’ which contained several conservatories possibly for tropical plants, a vineyard, bridges, a wide variety of trees, a botanical garden with a wide selection of unique plants, many from America, a wilderness and many seats, fountains, grotto’s and pavilions. Later the gardens fell into decline after George Spencer became bankrupt and his creditors set fire to his house in rage, the rest of the estate was sold off. But remains of the gardens was again found after the world wars.

photo by James Eggleton-unsplash.com

Pelargonium radula is a parent of the hybrid Pelargonium blandfordianum, it has decorative deeply incised leaves with a lemony rose fragrance and small pale pink flowers with dark purple markings on the upper petals. It has similar characteristics to P. graveolens which is closely related and possibly an equivalent to P. radens or a clone and also has a few forms with varied flower colours. The other parent is
Pelargonium quinquevulnereum

which was also believed to have been a hybrid, grown by Mr Armstrong who lived in Hampshire, that shares some similarities to Pelargonium graveolens.

Pelargonium radens is a tall upright shrub with delicate grey green finely divided leaves and light purple flowers with darker markings on the upper petals. The fragrance of the leaves are rose lemon scented and grows well in medium to large pots often growing beside other Plants.
Pelargonium graveolens has soft velvety triangular deeply incised leaves which have a somewhat rosy mint scent, a well known pelargonium since the 17th century in food and beverages, tea, potpourri and perfume.
Other hybrids related to Pelargonium radens or Pelargonium graveolens is P. ‘citrosum’ which has strong citronella lemon fragrance with pale pink flowers also known as the mosquito plant which is popular in the United States & Canada and is a cultivar of P. graveolens, also said to help deter mosquitoes.

P. ‘lady plymouth’ is a hybrid from the species
P. ‘graveolens’ with silver & cream leaves which
are variegated with a minty scent and light
purple flowers, there is also a similar cultivar
known as P ‘grey lady plymouth‘ with has grey
green leaves.
P. ‘Cinnamon rose’ has spicy cinnamon
scented leaves, and an upright growth with short
branches and pale purple flowers.
P. ‘Secret love’ is a eucalyptus scented leaf
pelargonium with light pink flowers showing
some characteristics to P. capitaum.
P. x melissinum is a cross between P. crispum
and P. graveolens which has large lemon balm
scented deeply cut leaves and pink flowers.

P. ‘rosemint’ has mint rose scented
leaves which are variegated and is used in
perfumes, showing some similarities to P.
lady plymouth.
P. ‘westerlund’ rose lemon scented leaf
close resembling that of P. graveolens.

Latest Pelargonium species & fresh seeds

Pelargonium  graveolens L’Her
Rose geranium
A beautiful pelargonium  which is  believed to be a cross between graveolens x radens and is often used for rose oil in perfume, soap and also toothpaste. It has pale pink  flowers with thin purple lines on the upper petals & each flowering stalk has about 1-7 flowers.  P. Graveolens L’ Her is an up right shrub with a spreading growth often trailing along the ground and up walls to reach towards the light  and prefers slightly sandy soil conditions in semi shade. It is ideal for fragrant gardens, rock gardens,or pots.

Pelargonium  ranunculophyllum
Horse shoe zoned pelargonium   
A lovely graceful pelargonium which has attractive rounded palmately lobed leaves with a reddish to deep purple zone (horse shoe mark) in the centre. The flowers are  narrow and white to pink sometimes with reddish  markings on the upper petals and pale orange to yellow pollen,  they are arranged on  long upright flowering stalks which  contains about 2-3 flowers. P. ranunculophyllum  is a low growing  plant  with long delicate stems   and  is smaller in size than P. alchemilloides  which has similar characteristics and with thinner stems.  It is native to the Eastern Cape where it grows in rocky sandstone or on mountainsides over 1000 m,  best grown in part shade in pots or planted in the garden and also combined with other plants.

Pelargonium  littorale
Pelargonium littorale Huegel
A graceful pelargonium with delicate pinkish stems and pale pink flowers  with dark purple markings on the upper petals & each flowering stalk contains 2-7 flowers. P. littorale is an upright low growing shrub which grows to about 10 – 50 cm in height and has heart shaped leaves. It is native to South West Australia  where it grows in coastal areas from the South Eastern corner to Geraldton in the North.  The name Littorale is derived from the Latin word ‘Littorlis” meaning shore (or grows close to the shore or littoral waters. Best planted in a small to medium sized pot or planted in the garden which is partly shaded by taller plants or rock garden.

New fresh seeds of Pelargonium mollicomum, pineapple scented leaf.
An attractive & graceful pelargonium with a slightly exotic appearance, it has creamy white flowers with thin purple lines on the upper petals & each flowering stalk has about 1-5 flowers. The light green rounded leaves are pineapple scented with a dark zone in the centre.  P. Mollicomum is a low growing shrub which reaches to about 50 cm/20 inches in height and prefers slightly sandy soil conditions. The name “mollicomum” is derived from the Latin word meaning soft hairs. It is ideal for fragrant gardens, window boxes,hanging baskets or pots.

New fresh seeds Pelargonium scabrum
A pretty pelargonium with strong lemon scented rhomboidal shaped leaves and white flowers.

View https://www.pelargoniumspeciesworld.com/page33.html

New fresh seeds P. hispidum – balsam
New fresh seeds P. odoratissmum-apple
New fresh seeds P. grossularioides- fruit
New fresh seeds P. Betulinum

View website : www.pelargoniumspeciesworld.com

Chocolate, hazelnut and Pelargonium tomentosum mousse

This creamy chocolate and minty dessert with pelargonium tomentosum leaves, hazelnuts ,Greek sheep yogurt and fruit makes a mouth watering delicious sweet dish to enjoy after your main meal in spring and summer.

Ingredients
1 packet of chocolate pudding power (7 servings)
I pot of Greek sheep yogurt or plain Greek style yogurt
4-5 leaves of pelargonium tomentosum, finely chopped
25 grams of chopped hazelnuts
3 to 4 small pears cut into small cubes
A sprinkle of cinnamon
A large drizzle of honey for each dish
Other fruits of your choice like peach, nectarine, strawberries, blueberries, prunes, watermelon or kiwifruit.

Dessert with pear and nectarines fruits

To prepare
First follow the instructions on the chocolate pudding packet, usually 48 grams of pudding power with 4-5 tablespoons of sugar and 660 ml of fresh or evaporated milk.
When you have prepared the mixture ready to add to the dessert dishes, add the chopped hazelnuts and pelargonium tomentosum leaves and mix well, then pour equally into each dish and leave to cool.
You can also choose to prepare only a few desserts and keep some back for later placing them in the fridge.  
Spoon the yogurt on top of each pudding individually, then add the chopped pear along with other fruits of your choice.
Sprinkle a little cinnamon on top of each dessert, a few chopped hazelnuts and a large drizzle of  honey .

Greek style meatballs with Pelargonium citronellum, spearmint & graviera cheese

These pungent & flavoursome meatballs filled with spearmint, pelargonium citronellum leaves and nutmeg make a delightful meal especially when added to tomato sauce and spaghetti.  The sweet spicy taste of peppermint, delicate lemony flavour of pelargonium citronellum scented leaves and the nutmeg, garlic & onions creates a tasty nourishing meal that enlivens the taste buds.

Ingredients
Half a kilo (17 oz) of minced meat
100g fine bread crumbs
2 grated onions
7-8 leaves of pelargonium citronellum, finely chopped
2 tsp crushed garlic cloves
Salt and pepper to taste
1 teaspoon of nutmeg
1 ½  tablespoons of fresh or dried Spearmint, finely chopped
50g of grated Graviera cheese or Swiss Grugere
A sprinkle of wine vinegar
2 table spoons olive oil
1 egg
A large Mixing bowl, refrigerate for about 2 hours

To prepare
First fry the onions and garlic for a few minutes or until softened then remove from heat & leave to cool.  In a prepared mixing bowl add the bread crumbs, spearmint, pelargonium leaves, nutmeg, vinegar, olive oil and then the fried onions and garlic and mix together.
Add the mincemeat and blend the ingredients together with your hands, add the egg and continue to mix, making sure all the mixture is blended well.
Make small meatballs by rolling a tiny portion on the palm of your hand or on a chopping board in a circular motion, then place them in  a container or wrapped in foil and place them in the refrigerator for about two hours
You can either dip them in egg and toasted breadcrumbs or in flour before frying in oil for about 15-20 minutes or until it has cooked all the way through.
Add them to Tomato sauce preferably containing mushrooms, garlic, onions, chicken stock, a little paprika and spaghetti.

Beautiful species pelargoniums native to Australia

Pelargonium littorale (left) is a low growing upright and delicate shrub which is similar to that of Pelargonium capitatum rose scented leaf and pelargonium grossularioides fruit scented leaf..
The flowers are pale pink with darker markers and each flowering stalk contains 2- 7 flowers with long and ovate sepals, the leaves can range from  oval, heart shaped, or orbicular.
P. littorale grows from about  10 to 50 cm’s in height and is covered with  glandular hairs, green to pinkish stems, classified under the section Peristera, as a subspecies (pelargonium littorale- Huegel subsp. Littorale)

This plant is native to South West Australia mostly in coastal areas from the South Eastern corner to the Geraldton sand plains in the north.. Which is why it was named Littorale from the Latin word ‘littoralis’ meaning shore (or grows close to the shore or littoral waters) It can also occur in Victoria and areas of South Australia.
South Western Australia is a eco zone with a Mediterranean like climate which has dry and hot summers and wet winters know as the botanical province which consists of a wide range of plant and animal life as well as woodlands, forests and eco areas of scrub land. This region also has honey possums which forage on flowering shrubs for nectar and pollen. Western bush wallabies and short tailed scrub wallabies.

Pelargonium helmsii (carolin) also known as the Alpine storks bill is native to bio-regions of victoria and New South Wales in mountainous areas including – Northern fall (highlands), Victorian alps and the snowy mountains, it has dark pink flowers with darker markings and oblong sepals with each flowering stalk containing up to 5-12 flowers. It is listed as vulnerable.
Pelargonium renifolium Swinbourne is also native to South Australia and has very small light pink flowers and a greater sprawling growth.

Pelargonium rodneyanum (below) also called the Magenta storks bill is native to specific areas of Australia including New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia. Where is grows on rocky hillsides, sclerophyll forests, woodlands and shrub land.  It has striking dark pink flowers with darker pink markings of the upper petals, on a long delicate flower stalk which contains up to seven flowers. The leaves are soft, light to dark green with shallow lobes and oval to narrow ovate in shape, it grows to about 45 cm’s in height with short stems and also produces brown tuberous roots.

This plant was named after Admiral George Rodney 1718-1792, a British Naval officer, who travelled along with Captain James Cook as head scientist exploring New Zealand and Australia collecting plant specimens for  the gardens of Kew.
Pelargonium rodneyanum is also grown as a garden plant in pots, flower beds or rock gardens because of its colourful flowers. It grows well in slightly acidic soil which has good drainage and is also a popular plant for ground cover.

Pelargonium alchemilloides (below) also known as the lady’s mantle-leaved pelargonium or Wildemaliva is native to a wide area of South Africa apart from the Northern Cape and grows in moist lowland regions usually in clay and loam soil conditions. It  has also been naturalised in temperate coastal areas of South-Western, Western Australia where it grows in shrublands, grasslands and woodlands. This plant has a rambling growth and is low growing, it adapts well to hot and dry environments with much rainfall during the winter period and has an underground tuber.

The flowers can range in colour from dark pink, yellow or white with darker markings and each flowering stalk contains about 3 to 6 flowers. The leaves are rounded or oval in shape with a purplish brown horseshoe zone in the centre, lobed with hairs which gives the impression of a silky texture.
The name alchemilloides refers to the plant Alchemilla (lady’s mantle) which bears some resemblance to this pelargonium, it is a perennial with green to yellow flowers and fan shaped leaves under the Rosaceae family to which the tea is used for medicinal purposes.

Pelargonium australe (below) is endemic to the whole of Australia apart from the Northern territory as well as eastern Tasmania and New Zealand, where it is also known by the name of the native storks bill.. It has white to light pink flowers and darker markings on the upper petals, arranged on long flower stalks which contains up to 12 flowers.

The leaves are slightly scented, hairy & rounded/ or oval with shallow lobes and the plant as a whole grows to about 30 cm’s in height, in its native habitat it grows in rocky areas, on cliffs by the coast, or in sand dunes.
The name australe means Southern possibly meaning the southern hemisphere. The stems of this plant are not so succulent like than that of P.drummondii, while the leaves, also show some similarities to P. capitatum but do not have rose scented leaves.

Pelargonium drummondii (below) shares some similarities to Pelargonium australe, but the stems are more branching with smaller flowers and thinner stems and also P. capitatum which grows all over the South West of Australia was original brought over by early colonists from Britain.

It is an upright shrub which grows to about 10 to 40 cm’s in height with succulent like leaves which are dark green & heart shaped. The flowers are white or pale pink  usually with  darker markings and each flowing stalk contains about 4 to 7 flowers.
It is native to coastal areas of South West Australia and also amongst granitic rocks on sloping ground, hills or small mountains.
This plant was given the name drummondii after James Drummond a Scottish gardener and botanist who became an early setter and collector of  newly discovered plants in Australia.

Pelargonium inodorum (below) which also goes by the name of the wild pelargonium or storks bill is an annual which is native to over a large area of  New South Wales where it grows in forests, woodlands, or grassy and rocky areas and also in Victoria, Tasmania and New Zealand.

The flowers are white or pink with darker markings of dark pink or purple and each flowering stalk contains about 3-14 flowers with oval or heart shaped leaves that are covered in short hairs. The flowers are small and are just a little larger in size than the sepals.
The name inodorum means unscented possibly referring to the flowers as it is believed to have slightly aromatic leaves.

Pelargonium graveolens, marjoram, bacon & tomato potato scones

These savoury potato scones are simply delicious to eat while using up your left over mash potato for breakfast, tea or with eggs.  The woody citrus floral taste of marjoram, delicate rose/mint pelargonium graveolens scented leaves and the bacon & tomato creates a tasty nourishing snack.

Ingredients
100g (4 oz) plain flour
Half a kilo (17 oz) of mashed potatoes
Half a tomato, skin removed and finely chopped
1 sprig of marjoram, leaves taken off the stalk
3-4 leaves of pelargonium graveolens, cut into small pieces
2 strips of bacon, lightly grilled or fried then roughly chopped
Salt and pepper to taste
A large Mixing bowl, Rolling pin and circular cutter.

 To prepare
First peel the potatoes, wash them removing any traces of skin or green  and cut them into quarters, boil until softened. Then remove the water and start to mash up the potatoes using a fork, crushing any lumps. Add a little milk, a pinch of salt & pepper and whisk well with a fork or wooden spoon until it becomes creamy in consistency.
Place the mashed potato into a large mixing bowl and add in the chopped tomato, lightly cooked bacon, herbs and pelargonium graveolens leaves and mix well together.
Next slowly add the sifted flour to the potato mixture kneading gently into a light dough and adding a little extra flour if needed.
Gather the dough into a ball and roll it out lightly to about 2 cm thick or press down using your hand, Cut out using a circular cutter.
You can then fry them in a pan with oil until browned each side or place them in the oven 500 F, gas mark 9, 240 C for 10 minutes ( turning over after 5 minutes).

Pelargonium tomentosum and its lovely hybrids

This peppermint scented leaf pelargonium can be added to cakes and beverages. It has delicate white flowers with purple markings on the upper petals and each branching flower stalks contains up to four to fifteen flowers which blooms during the beginning of Spring to Summer. The leaves are large and heart shaped with soft hairs which creates a velvety texture and is peppermint scented. P. tomentosum is native to the Western Cape where it grows in shady and moist areas mostly in narrow gorge forests fairly close to a river with rainfall during the winter months. This plant grows to about 50 centimetres in height and spreads over a large area, making it a lovely plant which grows well in  a medium to large sized pot.

The name tomentosum refers to the hairy leaves of this plant which is also used in essential oils, believed to have been brought to the gardens of Kew by Francis Masson a Scottish plant collector during the late 16th century from South Africa and has also grown naturally in Sicily for several years.

A hybrid of this species pelargonium includes P. tomentosum x P. quercifolium or possibly “Giant oak’ (a cultivar of P. quercifolium) known as chocolate peppermint which was created during the late 1900’s and gets its name from the chocolate zone in the centre of the velvety peppermint scented leaves that varies in colour from dark to light green. The flowers are light pink with purple markings on the upper petals and is Summer flowering, growing well in large containers.
It is crossed with Pelargonium quercifolium (pictured below) which has pinky purple to light pink flowers with darker purple markings on the upper petals, that are arranged on long flower stalks each containing up to six flowers, The leaves are balsam scented and resembles that of an oak leaf.
P. quercifolium is a upright branching plant which reaches a height of  about  175 cm’s and is native to parts of the Eastern and Western cape where it grows in rocky or cracked soil areas usually among sandstone, shale or limestone.  Its name quercifolium is derived from the Latin word “quercus” meaning having the leaves of a an oak leaf.

Pelargonium ‘giant oak’ like the pelargonium quercifolium has balsam scented leaves, dark green or dark brownish red with streaks. The flowers are light pinkish purple with darker veins on the upper petals.( Pictured below)

Another hybrid is crossed with Pelargonium tomentosum x P. tricolor called ‘Islington peppermint’ (below) which has attractive flowers with deep red upper petals and three white lowers petals. It is like a dwarf version of pelargonium tomentosum which grows to a height of 20 cm’s, the leaves are mint scented with soft hairs and a velvet texture.

P. Tricolor (pictured below) has quite a few flower colour variations similar to a wild pansy which ranges from deep red, white and pink upper petals with three white lower petals, the leaves are grey green narrow to oval with light hairs. This plant grows to about 30 cm’s in height and is native to the Eastern and Western Cape where it grows in dry areas in clay or sandy soil. The name tricolor refers to the three colours on the flowers, it was discovered by Francis Masson, the Scottish gardener and botanist during the late 1700’s, which was brought to the UK where it flowered and was then mentioned in the Botanical magazine in 1974.

Pelargonium ‘splendide’ is a hybrid of Pelaronium ovale and pelargonium tricolor, it has colourful pansy like flowers with deep purplish red upper petals and light pink lower petals which flowers during the Summer months. The leaves are grey green and narrow or oval with a velvety texture, It is an upright shrub-like pelargonium that grows well in pots, rock gardens and borders.

Pelargonium capitatum lavender & chocolate cup cakes

These tempting & delicious cupcakes are just heavenly to snack on during your coffee or tea break. The natural flavours of chocolate, rose leaf pelargonium and lavender create a delicate rose, minty floral taste along with the sweetened  lemon icing.

Ingredients
75g (3 oz) self raising flour (or plain flour with 1 tablespoon baking powder)
100g(4 oz) caster sugar
100g margarine
2 eggs, beaten
3-4 sprigs of lavender flowers, flowers taken off stalk
3-4 leaves of pelargonium capitatum, cut into small pieces
3 tablespoons of cocoa powder (mixed in with the eggs)
A pinch of cinnamon
Topping (optional) lemon icing or another favour of your choice
One lemon,  100g icing sugar

To prepare
First place 18 paper cases onto a prepared  cupcake baking tray, then add the margarine and  the sugar into a warmed mixing bowl, cream the two ingredients  together using a wooden spoon until it is lighter in colour with a fluffy consistency, also mixing in any of the mixture left at the sides of the bowl.
Mix the  cocoa with a small amount of water in a small bowl  so that it turns into a paste and then add it to the beaten eggs, blending it well together with a fork. Then Add the egg/cocoa mixture a little at a time to the margarine and sugar mix, beating well together.
Next slowly fold in the flour making it as light as possible, adding the pinch of cinnamon, chopped rose scented pelargonium leaves and lavender flowers, Mix together and then spoon the mixture into the paper cases  and place them in the oven for 20 minutes at a temperature of 190 c (375 F mark 5)
lightly press the top of the cup cake with your finger to tell if they are ready and if it bounces back then they can be taken out of the oven and allow to cool.
After baking you can choose to add a layer of icing sugar with a sprinkle of lavender flowers and  then serve with a refreshment such as tea or coffee.
Icing sugar (optional)
Prepare a bowl and add 100g of icing sugar, then pour in one tablespoon of  lemon juice and mix together using the back of a spoon until it is the right consistency, adding another tablespoon or icing sugar  if needed.. Make sure the cakes are on a level surface then gently pour a small amount on top of each cake and spread it over with a knife, or if you prefer you can use a piping bag. Sprinkle with lavender flowers and or decorate with pelargonium flowers.

Pelargonium oblongatum & its amazing hybrids

This charming pelargonium with its soft delicate shades of  yellow or cream coloured flowers are simple and elegant on long branching scapes, the larger upper petals have reddish purple veins and stamens that curve upwards making it easier for insects to pollinate it. The leaves are oval or rounded & toothed  as well as having a tuberous root which is partly above ground with layers of thin brown bark.
P. Oblongatum is native to the Northern cape where it grows in hot and dry areas of shrub land in the succulent Karoo, The leaves usually appear during the winter months after a rainy period at ground level while protecting the smaller succulents below, the flowers begin to bloom in October to November, but remains dormant during the Summer. The name oblong refers to long tuber of this plant which grows to a thickness of 15 cm’s, to which the whole shrub reaches a  height of about 30 cm’s, listed under the Hoarea section. This plant was first discovered by William John Burchell during his travels to South Africa, an explorer who collected thousands of specimens for the gardens of Kew.

A hybrid of this species pelargonium includes P. oblongatum x P. Fulgidum ( pictured right) which has striking pinkish red flowers with dark red veins, arranged on long flower stalks, the upper petals are much larger and rounded than the three lower petals, which are long and thin. The leaves are also smaller than that of  P. Oblongatum which have rounded teeth.

Another colour variation of Pelargonium oblongatum x fulgidum  has very pale pink flowers with dark pinkish red veins and light green sepals that are arranged on  long brownish red flower stalks ( pictured below)

It is crossed with Pelargonium fulgidum (pictured below) which has brightly coloured scarlet or pinky red flowers arranged on long flower stalks each having four to nine flowers. The leaves are oblong to cordate with very small greyish hairs that have a soft texture and three to six lobes that curve backwards. P. Fulgidum is a low growing plant which reaches a height of  about  40 to 100 cm’s and is native to the Western cape where it grows in sandy areas and hillsides usually among granite ,appearing in winter during the rainy season.  Its name fulgidum is derived from the Latin word “Fulgidus” meaning having brightly coloured flowers, to which many hybrids are descended from this plant.

Another hybrid is P. oblongatum x hystrix ( pictured below) which  has white flowers and dark reddish veins on the upper petals which fold backwards, the centre of the flower and sepals are light green with long stamens.

The hybrid is crossed with Pelargonium hystrix (below) which has white or light cream coloured flowers, with dark reddish veins on its narrow and rectangular petals. It is a low growing succulent like shrub with thick stems and continuous spikes or stipules, which is why this plant goes by the name hystrix  as it is derived from the word “hystrichos” meaning porcupine, the leaves are oval and pinnately divided.  
P. hystrix is native to the South Western cape and western parts of the Karoo. usually  growing  under larger plants or in dry areas when it is dormant during the Summer months. This plant was discovered by Francis Masson, the Scottish gardener and botanist during the 1700’s, which was brought to the gardens of Kew.

Other hybrids of Pelargonium oblongatum include:
P. oblongatum x radicatum- has about 15 or more small white flowers arranged on a long flowering stem, with reddish pink markings on the upper petals.
P. seifcifolium x oblongatum- has attractive bright purplely pink flowers with dark purple veins, the upper petals are much larger than the lower.
P. oblongatum x cucullatum- it has similar flowers to that of P. Cucullatum but they are much lighter in colour.

References-
Book -Pelargoniums Diana miller
https://www.geraniaceae-group.org/gallery/pelargonium-species-hybrids-g-z/